Beers (and Foods) of Fall

It’s our favorite time of the year here in New England. There’s a crispness in the air, the leaves are changing, and football is back! Our Harvest Collection variety pack is the perfect pairing for all of your favorite fall activities, especially: tailgating. We’ve been experimenting with a few recipes and doing our tailgating homework (it’s a tough job, but somebody has to do it).  Here’s a guide to fall beer and tailgating food pairings we recommend  you try out this fall.

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cowboy-beef-boston-lager-chili--en--7aecdc3c-2493-40da-a855-5f603ae1c538Boston Lager: No matter what time of year, Boston Lager is our go-to beer. And luckily for us, it pairs with one of our go-to foods for football season – chili. The beer’s malty sweetness matches nicely with the roasted flavors of the beans, meat and tomatoes. The hop spiciness of the Hallertau hops work well too if you like your game day chili with a little heat. Check out our recipe for Cowboy Beef Boston Lager Chili to kick this pairing up a notch.

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Samuel Adams Summer Ale Steamed Halibut (or Chicken) in Foil with Prosciutto, Vegetables and Lemon

foil chicken

Looking to mix up your grilling this summer? Chef David Burke came up with a recipe that can be used for chicken or fish. He suggests grilling this one with aluminum foil, which will keep the meat (or fish) juicy and tender. It also allows for you to prepare it ahead of time and makes for easy clean up, so you can spend more of your time enjoying a beer with friends.


4 T olive oil

Zest and juice of 2 lemons

1 fennel bulb, slivered

1 zucchini, cut into ½-inch slices

1 yellow squash, cut into ½ -inch slices

1 large tomato, diced

½ cup blanched green beans, cut into ½-inch lengths

1 bunch fresh basil, finely chopped

¼ pound prosciutto ham, cut into thin strips

4 T bottled white horseradish

6 halibut steaks or fillets (or chicken breasts), about 5-6 ounces each

3 T cracked black peppercorns

Kosher salt to taste

Whole grain mustard

2 cans of Samuel Adams Summer Ale (¼ cup per foil pack)

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Cooking with Beer for the Big Game: Cheese Boston Lager Sliders

Looking for a fun dish to snack on during the big game on Sunday? Chef David Burke gave us a recipe for Boston Lager Sliders and Boston Lager ketchup that are quick and easy to put prepare so you can enjoy the game just as much as you will enjoy the food (and beer)!

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Cheese Boston Lager Sliders (Yields 20 servings)


20 small burger buns or English muffins, halved
40 oz. ground beef
4 bottles Samuel Adams Boston Lager
Sliced pickles
40 slices American cheese, cut in 1 inch x 1 inch pieces
20 cherry tomatoes, skewered


Slice half of the bread. Scoop out ½ of the bread on the bottom portion. Fill with 2 oz. ground beef that has been tossed with Samuel Adams Boston Lager. Place on sheet pan upside down (on meat side) to brown meat for 3 minutes in a 350 degree oven. Remove from oven and top meat with cheese, thinly sliced pickles and top of English muffin. Heat in oven for 5 minutes at 350 degrees. Remove from heat and skewer with tomato. Serve immediately.

Boston Lager Ketchup (Yields 10 servings)


2 cups ketchup
2 cups mayonnaise
4 tbsp Boston Lager


Mix together all ingredients and serve with sliders.

Cooking With Hops This Weekend

ChurrosA few weeks back we cozied up to the idea of cooking with hops. Now, as we head into the weekend, we wanted to share a few new recipes to try out, including our new fire-side favorites, Hops-Infused Churros with Hoppy Hot Chocolate, and our Alpine Spring Donut Ice Cream Sliders (full recipes below).

We teamed up with our friend, Chef David Burke who prepared these dishes inspired by Samuel Adams Alpine Spring, and infused with the “spice of beer” – hops. Alpine Spring’s Tettnang Tettnanger hops, a variety cultivated on 100-year-old vines in hop gardens at the foothills of the Alps, leave a lingering citrus note and a dry finish that cleanses the palate after each bite. When used as a cooking ingredient, hops can add surprising dimension to a recipe, much like in brewing. In Chef Burke’s brunch recipes, these hops add an unexpected yet welcome earthy, herbal note to the meal. Read More

Not Just for Beer: Cooking with Hops

As we’ve said many times before, “hops are to beer what grapes are to wine.” Their variety, origin, and nuances of flavor create the soul of the beer. For most beers, hops lend bitterness and not a lot more. That bitterness comes from the alpha acids of the hop. However, we select hops for the aromatic flavor qualities over their bittering value. Aroma hops, with their lower alpha acids, produce an array of complex flavors and aromas in our beers from citrus and fruit to pine and eucalyptus. If you love beer but don’t know much about hops, we recommend this great hop round-up from Draft Magazine.Alpine-Spring-and-Hops-150x150

With the thought of hops running through your head, we wanted to take this moment to let you know that our brewing team have come together with our friend Chef David Burke to develop an awesome hops-infused brunch inspired by our Alpine Spring seasonal brew. For those who have tasted this bright and citrusy unfiltered lager, you have experienced the Tettnang Tettnanger hops which are cultivated on 100-year-old vines in hop gardens at the foothills of the Alps.

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