Cooking With Hops This Weekend

ChurrosA few weeks back we cozied up to the idea of cooking with hops. Now, as we head into the weekend, we wanted to share a few new recipes to try out, including our new fire-side favorites, Hops-Infused Churros with Hoppy Hot Chocolate, and our Alpine Spring Donut Ice Cream Sliders (full recipes below).

We teamed up with our friend, Chef David Burke who prepared these dishes inspired by Samuel Adams Alpine Spring, and infused with the “spice of beer” – hops. Alpine Spring’s Tettnang Tettnanger hops, a variety cultivated on 100-year-old vines in hop gardens at the foothills of the Alps, leave a lingering citrus note and a dry finish that cleanses the palate after each bite. When used as a cooking ingredient, hops can add surprising dimension to a recipe, much like in brewing. In Chef Burke’s brunch recipes, these hops add an unexpected yet welcome earthy, herbal note to the meal. Read More

The Perfect Valentine’s Day Couple: Chocolate and Beer

Choc-and-Beer-Glass-150x150Valentine’s Day tends to be a wine-centric holiday, but pairing beer with Valentine’s Day favorites, such as chocolate, is a great way to take your relationship with craft beer to another level. In case you didn’t have a chance to try our holiday chocolate box, we have once again teamed up with our friends at San Francisco-based craft chocolate maker TCHO to offer a surprising combination that’s sure to satisfy the craft beer lover in your life: The “Love of Beer” Chocolate Box and Samuel Adams Boston Lager.

Beer and Wine Sommelier Gianni Cavicchi of the NYC Tour de France Restaurants put it best when he said, “Just as there’s someone for everyone, there’s a beer to perfectly pair with any food or dessert – it’s all about letting the flavor of one enhance the other. Read More

Not Just for Beer: Cooking with Hops

As we’ve said many times before, “hops are to beer what grapes are to wine.” Their variety, origin, and nuances of flavor create the soul of the beer. For most beers, hops lend bitterness and not a lot more. That bitterness comes from the alpha acids of the hop. However, we select hops for the aromatic flavor qualities over their bittering value. Aroma hops, with their lower alpha acids, produce an array of complex flavors and aromas in our beers from citrus and fruit to pine and eucalyptus. If you love beer but don’t know much about hops, we recommend this great hop round-up from Draft Magazine.Alpine-Spring-and-Hops-150x150

With the thought of hops running through your head, we wanted to take this moment to let you know that our brewing team have come together with our friend Chef David Burke to develop an awesome hops-infused brunch inspired by our Alpine Spring seasonal brew. For those who have tasted this bright and citrusy unfiltered lager, you have experienced the Tettnang Tettnanger hops which are cultivated on 100-year-old vines in hop gardens at the foothills of the Alps.

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